• Information

    Being homeless means you are more vulnerable to the spread of infectious disease than people with housing. The rigours of life on the streets mean that people experiencing homelessness have compromised health and are vulnerable to the spread of infectious disease.

Courses are collections of resources grouped by topic. Some of these range from beginner basics (such as Housing First 101) to specifics in case management (such as working with youth). As the website develops and grows, we will create more self-paced courses with clear learning outcomes (much like the Systems Planning Collective Learning Modules). 

Pro-tip: Did you like a resource or course? "Favourite" it and you can come back to it under My Account.

Course Listings

  • Course Placeholder Image of a webpage

    The Homeless Individuals and Families Information System (HIFIS) is a web-enabled Homelessness Management Information System (HMIS) that can provide communities with the information they need to further their efforts with addressing homelessness. It allows multiple service providers from the same geographic area to implement coordinated access using real-time information about people experiencing homelessness and the resources they need to find and keep a home.

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    To engage communities on implementing a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) and on data management, strategies and project planning are essentials aspects for any successful implementation. It also requires the collaboration of service providers, front line users, and clients to leverage multidisciplinary team and create change.

  • Coordinated Access

    The Reaching Home – Coordinated Access course provides guidance and detailed information on how to design, implement and operate Coordinated Access in communities. This course has been developed to support communities receiving funding from Reaching Home: Canada’s Homelessness Strategy and beyond, to support their efforts in preventing and reducing homelessness.

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    The work for a Point-in-Time (PiT) count does not end after the count is conducted. This course provides guidance and tools to support the Post-Count phase of a PiT count. It covers data entry, management, and analysis, as wells as post-count communication and planning for subsequent counts. This is Part 4 in a four-part series:

    1. PIT Count Planning 

    2. PIT Count Preparation 

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    This course provides guidance and tools to support the final implementation of a Point-in-Time (PiT) Count, as well as the day of the count. In this phase, communities obtain any supplies needed for the count, assign volunteers to teams and provide training, set up their headquarters, and conduct the count. This is Part 3 in a four-part series:

    1. PIT Count Planning 

    2. PIT Count Preparation 

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    This course provides guidance and tools for the preparation stage of a Point-in-Time (PiT) Count. In this stage, communities determine the areas to be surveyed, finalize any additional survey questions as well as develop a plan for the day of the count. In this plan, communities should include information on the location of the headquarters and the resources needed on the PiT count day, for example. This is Part 2 in a four-part series:

    1. PIT Count Planning 

    2. PIT Count Preparation